Advanced Foot and Ankle Center Blog

Posts for tag: Injuries

If you're a runner, it goes without saying that your feet take the brunt of the punishment. In fact, for runners the feet are more vulnerable to injury than any other part of the body. Luckily, both long-distance runners and casual joggers can improve their performance by paying extra attention to their feet and taking steps to prevent common foot problems. Poor fitting footwear is often the source of many foot problems caused by running. A visit to our practice can help you determine the best shoes for your foot structure. and treatment and prevention of Blisters.

A Runner's Roadblock:While many running-related foot injuries can result from a fall or twisted ankle, most running injuries are caused by overuse, meaning the majority of runners experience foot and ankle pain because they do too much for too long. Runners should be aware of the signs of foot problems that can slow them down if not treated promptly. Common foot and ankle injuries experienced by runners include:

Blisters: Blisters are typically caused by excess friction+sheer. Certain socks can add to blister formation, ill fitting shoes and biomecanics can also contribute. Treatment and prevention can include: topical treatments like moleskin and emollients, change in socks or sneakers and inserts with accomodative or offloading pads. 

Achilles Tendonitis: Achilles tendonitis and other calf-related injuries are prevalent in runners. Poor training, overuse and improper footwear are the three most common reasons for this condition. A sudden increase in distance or pace can strain the muscles and tendons in the foot and ankle, causing small tears within these structures that result in pain and inflammation. Appropriate shoes and training are the most important steps to preventing Achilles tendonitis. Conservative treatment includes rest, ice, stretching and sometimes orthotics or physical therapy.

Heel Pain: Runners develop heel pain more than any other foot-related injury. Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain, the result of placing excessive stress on the ligament in the bottom of the foot. Rest, stretching and support are the best ways to ease the pain and inflammation. Reduce your mileage and avoid hill and speed workouts. Stretch before and after you run, and ice your heel after each workout. Special splints and shoe inserts from our practice may also provide support and relief for your heel pain.

Stress Fractures: Stress fractures are small cracks in the surface of a bone. Runners generally notice gradual muscle soreness, stiffness and pain on the affected bone, most often in the lower leg or the foot. Early diagnosis is critical, as a small fracture can spread and eventually become a complete fracture of the bone. Stress fractures are typically caused by increasing training more quickly than the body's ability to build up and strengthen the bone.

If you have symptoms of a stress fracture, you should stop running immediately and see a podiatrist. This injury can keep a runner off the track for several weeks, and is not an injury that you can run through. Depending on the severity of the stress fracture, a cast may be necessary.

If you experience chronic foot pain from running, make an appointment with a podiatrist. Leaving foot injuries untreated could result in more serious conditions, ultimately keeping you from your best performance. Keep in mind that these are not the only foot ailments caused by running, and when at-home foot care isn't effective, you'll need to be evaluated by a podiatrist. As in most cases, prevention is the best medicine. Good footwear, proper training and recognizing a problem before it becomes serious are your keys to staying on the road and avoiding foot injuries.

Sincerely,

Advanced Foot & Ankle

972.542.2155

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
May 01, 2020
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Shoes   Injuries  
The Right ShoesExercise is an important aspect of keeping our bodies healthy and happy. That’s why it’s so important to wear the correct shoes for certain activities. Whether you’re an athlete, workout buff, or enjoy walking and hiking, you need the proper footwear. It makes the difference between enjoying your favorite activities and sitting out with an avoidable injury. Talk to your podiatrist to have your feet evaluated for your future workout needs.
 
Essential Equipment
All exercise involves your feet, ankles, and knees. Placing pressure on them puts you at risk for strains, sprains, and wear-and-tear injuries. Find shoes made specifically for the activity you engage in while also providing a good fit. They should accommodate your body and activity level. 
 
Pay attention to the wear on your older shoes. The soles show where you need more support in the future. The right shoe also feels good from the start. Don’t believe the sentiment that a shoe needs to be broken in. This is not true and creates ongoing problems. 
 
Matching Your Shoe to Your Sport
Different types of exercise affect your feet in different ways. Your shoes need to support the high-risk areas. 
  • Running requires shoes with shock absorption. Your feet take on a lot of pressure and friction. Cushioning your shoes in the correct areas keeps you from feeling the pain. 
  • Traction is important in sports that need quick changes in direction and sprinting, like basketball. Traction should never be too high or low. The right shoes keep you from slipping on the floor while letting you move and pivot.
  • Ankle support is a must. It limits the side-to-side movement that knocks your ankle out of alignment. This kind of support keeps ankle sprains at bay. For sports like basketball, hockey, skiing, and skating, make sure that your shoes aren’t too high. Otherwise, they will dig into your Achilles tendon. You can also wear soft ankle braces.
  • Arch support varies for everyone. Your podiatrist can test your foot to determine your gait. Depending on the results, your podiatrist can recommend orthotics or special shoe inserts.
Remember to Replace Your Old Shoes
Pay attention to the state of your shoes to understand when to replace them. When the condition starts to decline, especially the arch support and sole, it’s time to go shopping. Start looking for a replacement when they become uncomfortable and wear differently. You don’t have to wear shoes for a long time for them to wear out either. If you are participating in sports or activity on an almost daily basis, your shoes are bound to wear out quickly.