Advanced Foot and Ankle Center Blog

Posts for category: Foot Problems

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
May 22, 2020
Category: Foot Problems
Tags: Morton's Neuroma   Neuroma  
Morton's NeuromaA podiatrist can help you with a variety of conditions that affect the feet, including Morton’s neuroma. A neuroma is the thickening of nerve tissue in the body, with Morton's neuroma specifically happening in the ball of the foot. It’s caused by an irritation in the nerve between the third and fourth toes. Patients experience pain while walking, with a burning, tingling, or numbness. 
 
Developing Morton’s Neuroma
 
There isn’t any known cause for Morton’s neuroma. There are a few factors that can increase your risk though. These include: 
  • Trauma or injury to the foot, damaging the nerve and resulting in swelling.
  • Improper footwear, like shoes that squeeze the foot together. High heels also increase pressure on the vulnerable areas.
  • Recurring stress to the feet through repeated physical activities or exercise. This is common with patients who are constantly on their feet due to their job. 
  • Deformities of the foot, like a high arch or flat foot. These lead to instability throughout the foot. 
The most important thing that your podiatrist recommends is wearing comfortable shoes. You don’t want anything that squeezes or hurts. Always wear athletic shoes when engaging in any physical activity. 
 
How to Treat Morton’s Neuroma at Home
 
Start by finding shoes that give your toes lots of room and are easily adjustable. The soles need to be shock-absorbent and thick. This keeps the pressure off the feet. You should also invest in shoe inserts or soles recommended by your podiatrist. Lastly, pay attention to your feet and their pain levels. When your Morton’s neuroma starts to act up, take a minute to rest. Take off your shoe and massage the area. An ice pack brings down the swelling too. 
 
Talking to Your Podiatrist
 
You should schedule an appointment with your podiatrist as soon as you experience foot problems. Morton’s neuroma gets worse without treatment. Identifying the neuroma early on can prevent needing aggressive treatment options like surgery. 
 
For early forms of Morton’s neuroma, changing your shoes is enough to relieve your symptoms. Your podiatrist’s goal for early treatment is to relieve pressure from the affected area. After going through a physical examination and having X-rays done, your podiatrist creates a treatment plan that works for you. 
 
There are a few different options that can work for you:
  • Taping and padding: This is a special type of tape and bandages that you place on the bottom of the foot. This helps with your symptoms. 
  • Orthotics: These are the custom shoes that your podiatrist can create for you. 
  • Medication: Cortisone injections reduce the pain and inflammation in the foot. Anti-inflammatory drugs also reduce your swelling. 
  • Surgery is the last resort for treatment. The procedure is done on an outpatient basis. The injured nerve is removed and recovery takes a few weeks.
By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
June 12, 2018
Category: Foot Problems
Tags: heel pain  

What your podiatrists in McKinney and Prosper want you to know about heel painHeel Pain

Do you suffer from stabbing, aching heel pain? Do you have to limit walking and standing because of it? If you answered yes to these questions, you will be happy to know that there is relief from heel pain, thanks to the treatments available from your podiatrist.

In order to find the most effective treatment, you need to know what is causing your heel pain. The podiatrists at Advanced Foot and Ankle Center want to share some common causes and treatments for heel pain. They have two convenient office locations in McKinney and Prosper, TX, to help your feet.

You can have heel pain as a result of medical factors including obesity, flat feet, or diabetes. You can also experience heel pain if you wear poorly-fitting, unsupportive shoes. Running, tennis, or other high-impact sports may also cause heel pain.

Foot injuries are a common cause of heel pain. If you step on a sharp object, you can get a deep bruise your heel. Excess calcium deposits on your heel, commonly known as a heel spur, can also result in heel pain.

For these causes of heel pain, prevention is important. Always wear supportive shoes appropriate for the activity you are doing, and maintain a comfortable weight. Also, monitor the surface you are walking on, and clear your floors of objects that could injure your feet.

Heel pain is also often caused by inflammation of the thick band of tissue running across your heel, known as the plantar fascia. When you suffer from this inflammation, you have plantar fasciitis. It can be caused by walking or standing on hard surfaces for long periods of time, overpronation when you walk, and running, jogging, playing tennis, or other high-impact sports.

If you suffer from plantar fasciitis, it’s best to visit your podiatrist. Common treatments for plantar fasciitis from the podiatrists at Advanced Foot and Ankle Center include:

  • Custom-fit orthotics or padding
  • Walking casts or night splints
  • Physical therapy and stretching
  • Corticosteroid injections
  • Surgical treatment for severe cases

You deserve to enjoy your life without pain. To get relief from your heel pain, call the podiatrists at Advanced Foot and Ankle Center, with offices in McKinney and Prosper, TX. Protect your feet from heel pain by calling today!

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
October 13, 2017
Category: Foot Problems
Tags: Varicose Veins  

Varicose veins are very easy to spot, which is why patients usually want them to disappear. They're a cosmetic issue but also a potentially painful podiatric issue that can be treated by a foot doctor. Learn what causes varicose veins and how you may be able to reduce their appearance with a podiatrist's help.

About Varicose Veins
When the veins appear to pop out of the skin on your legs, thighs and feet, they are called varicose veins. They often look blue or dark in appearance and can cause pain in the legs. This is because the veins are swelling from too much blood. It’s a problem that’s related to poor circulation and vascular health. Because the legs and feet are furthest from the heart, it’s more difficult for blood to flow back up through the body. It’s a condition that occurs most often in older women.

What Causes Them?
The Chicago Vein Institute says that about half of people over the age of 50 have varicose veins. They can develop for a number of reasons:

  • Obesity (the extra weight affects your circulation and puts stress on your legs when walking)
  • Pregnancy (again, due to the added weight)
  • Standing for long periods of times at a job
  • Heredity (patients who have two parents with varicose veins are more likely to get them)

Reducing the Appearance of Varicose Veins
Consider making your podiatrist your first line of defense when trying to treat varicose veins. Here are a few possible ways your foot doctor can help reduce the appearance of dark, swollen veins:

  • Taking an ultrasound of the legs to check the flow of blood (ensure there are no blockages)
  • Physical therapy and exercises to get the blood circulating properly
  • Prescribing orthotic device to relieve pressure on your feet when standing or walking
  • Compression stocks to reduce swelling and stimulate circulation
  • Leg massage therapy
  • Surgery in certain cases (sclerotherapy, laser and endoscopic vein surgeries are options)

Get Help from a Podiatrist
Relief from unsightly varicose veins can be found at your podiatrist’s office. Contact a foot doctor in your area to discuss treatments that will help you feel more confident in the appearance and function of the veins in your legs and feet.

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
October 11, 2017
Category: Foot Problems
Tags: Lisfranc Fracture  

Any fracture to the foot or ankle should be taken seriously, but a Lisfranc fracture is particularly concerning for podiatrists. Because the fracture happens at the center of the foot where there are many connections, without prompt treatment this problem can significantly reduce your ability to walk or participate in athletic activities. The worse the fracture gets, the harder it is to treat. Learn more about Lisfranc fractures to see if this might be the foot problem you're experiencing.

What Is a Lisfranc Fracture?
When the bones at the center of the foot become fractured, broken or shift out of place it is called a Lisfranc injury. The ligaments that hold the bones together and cartilage at joints can also tear. This can happen when a heavy object falls on the foot, the patient has a bad fall or the foot twists unnaturally. Athletes, like soccer and football players, may be at risk for Lisfranc fractures. 

Why It’s a Concern
A Lisfranc fracture is a major concern for podiatrists because if it is allowed to go untreated for an extended period of time it can lead to a disability of the foot. It often causes the bottom of the foot to swell, bruise and become darkly discolored (a telltale sign of a Lisfranc fracture). It can also be a very painful condition that is difficult to ignore.

Lisfranc Fracture Treatments
Your foot doctor will take X-rays to confirm that you have a Lisfranc injury. If so, conservative treatments may be implemented first, including wearing a removable cast or an orthotic device that will train your bones and joints into a position for healing. In a severe case where there’s a clear fracture or severe subluxation of the bones, you may have to have foot surgery. Two common surgical solutions are fusion (healing the bones together) and internal fixation (involves the use of screws and other devices to repair the foot).

Talk to a Podiatrist
The earlier you seek treatment for a Lisfranc fracture, the better for your long-term foot health. Your podiatrist will discuss your options and come up with an ideal plan for fixing the problem. Call a foot doctor today to schedule an exam and get an official diagnosis.

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
September 18, 2017
Category: Foot Problems
Tags: Sesamoid Injuries  

Everything You Need to Know About Sesamoid Injuries

 


Think you have a sesamoid injury? Sesamoids are bones embedded in tendons. Sesamoid injuries are often associated with activities requiring increased pressure on the foot, such as tennis, basketball, running, and football. Podiatrists diagnose and treat various foot problems, including sesamoid injuries. Here's everything you've ever wanted to know about sesamoid injuries.

Types of Sesamoid Injuries

Sesamoid injuries can involve the bones, tendons, and surrounding tissue in the joint. Sesamoiditis is an injury involving inflammation of the sesamoid bones and tendons. A sesamoid fracture is an acute or chronic fracture in the sesamoid bone. Turf toe is an injury to the soft tissue surrounding the big toe joint. 

Sesamoid Injury Causes

Sesamoid injuries can be caused by landing too hard on the foot after a fall or jump. Cracks in the sesamoid bones can be caused by wear and tear on the foot over time. People with high arches are at risk for developing sesamoid injuries. Frequently wearing high heels can also be a contributing factor. 

Sesamoid Injury Symptoms

The most common symptom of a sesamoid injury is pain when you move your big toe, stand, run, jump, or walk. With a fracture, the pain will be immediate, whereas with sesamoiditis, pain may develop gradually. A sesamoid injury may be painful for weeks to months. Bruising and swelling may or may not be present.

Sesamoid Injury Diagnosis

If you think you have a sesamoid injury, see a podiatrist for proper diagnosis and treatment. Your podiatrist will ask about your symptoms, activities, and medical history and examine your foot. To diagnose your foot problem, your podiatrist may order X-rays and laboratory tests.

Sesamoid Injury Treatment

Inflammation and pain are treated with oral medications or steroid injections. A pad may be placed in your shoe to cushion the sesamoid area. Your foot may be placed in a cast and crutches may be used to take pressure off of your foot. The rehabilitation period following immobilization may include physical therapy, such as therapeutic exercises and ultrasound therapy. Your podiatrist may recommend surgery if your symptoms persist after nonsurgical treatment. 

A sesamoid injury can affect your day-to-day activities and make life frustrating and miserable. Life always offers us another chance to get back on track. It's called today. Get relief today by scheduling an appointment with a podiatrist near you. A podiatrist can provide all the relief you need, with relatively little expense or hassle.