Advanced Foot and Ankle Center Blog

Posts for tag: Infection

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
January 31, 2019
Category: Foot Care
Tags: ingrown toenail   Infection  

We get a lot of patients that come in for a variety of foot/ankle conditions that are due to increased inflammation. This inflammation might be occurring in a joint, along a tendon, a ligament, a bursa, a nerve or other anatomical structures.  Many of our patients have had steroid shots in the past, most commonly the knees.  Some people are very familiar with steroid shots and others have no idea, so the purpose of this blog is to give everyone a little background. 

A steroid (also known as cortisone) injection is a synthetic medication that closely relates to our bodies production of cortisol which is secreted during stress.  Cortisol has a very short duration while cortisone lasts longer.  Cortisone is not the same type of steroid used for performance enhancement in athletes.   There are also multiple types of cortisone used for different areas of the body. 

Cortisone is a strong anti-inflammatory and instead of taking large doses by mouth and a small amount reaches your foot, we put a small amount of medication right at the site of concern.  There are also fewer side effects with a local injection vs oral medication.

Although cortisone injections are very safe, anytime something enters your body there is a chance of a side effect or complication.  The most common side effect we see is a steroid flare.  This is your body’s response to the steroid that can cause an increase in pain at the injection site for hours or several days.  There is really no way to predict if this will happen to you.  Less common side effects include skin thinning or discoloration.  It is also important to know that cortisone can increase your blood glucose so diabetics must understand to keep a close eye on their sugars.  Another side effect with the injection is that it can weaken nearby structures, because of this, we cannot put cortisone injections at certain areas of the body.  There is also is a certain number of injections you can receive in a set time. 

As you can see, the answer is not a clear yes or no.  There are multiple factors that go into a steroid shot including what is the reason for your pain, where is the pain located, what medical problems you have, etc. 

At Advanced Foot and Ankle, our provides have experience with this and make this decision many times each day.  If you have a question about this or any other foot/ankle condition.  Please call us at 972-542-2155. 

Thank you and have a wonderful day,

Dr. Witt

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
November 20, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: ingrown toenail   Infection  

Ingrown toenails may begin mildly but can quickly go from bad to worse. This frustrating and painful condition can affect anyone and cause significant issues. Unlike other foot-related conditions, which are often due to genetics or underlying conditions, ingrown toenails are almost always preventable and often come from lifestyle choices like the type of shoes you wear or the way you trim your toenails.

Do I have an ingrown toenail?

Ingrown toenails are easy to spot if you know what to look for. The nail begins to grow inward, curling in on one or both sides of the toenail and digging into the skin. An ingrown nail may begin with mild pain and discomfort and end up advancing quickly, producing symptoms like severe pain, difficulty walking, or even infection — which produces its own set of symptoms such as pus drainage or fever.

How can I prevent an ingrown toenail?

Preventing an ingrown toenail often boils down to the way you trim your nails and care for your feet. Always cut the nail straight across the top and never round off the corners to ensure that the nail grows straight. Wearing too-tight or narrow shoes which place pressure onto the toe can also contribute an ingrown toenail. Additionally, always keep your feet dry and clean and wear fresh socks daily.

Treating Ingrown Toenails

There are home remedies that may help stop the pain caused by ingrown toenails, such as soaking the foot in a warm foot bath and wearing better fitting footwear. Your podiatrist may be able to prescribe antibiotics to help avoid infection. In some cases, surgery by your podiatrist may be necessary. It's important to consult your doctor to see which method is best for you.

If you think you have an ingrown toenail or need help learning to better prevent them, a podiatrist can help you determine the best plan to healthier feet. Consulting with your foot doctor at regular foot examinations can help ensure that your feet stay healthy and pain-free for years to come.