Advanced Foot and Ankle Center Blog

Posts for tag: Flat Feet

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
March 15, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Flat Feet  
Flat FeetAre you flat-footed? If so, you join the ranks of about 18 million American adults over age 21 that also have this common foot condition, reports the National Foot Health Assessment. Having flat feet simply means that you don’t have arches in your feet, which means that the entire foot touches the ground when you stand or walk. While flat feet won’t cause problems for some, others may regularly deal with achy, sore feet or pain in the ankles, legs, or thigh. If you are dealing with foot pain and you think it may be due to flat feet, your podiatrist can help.

What causes flat feet?

Sometimes flat feet are simply inherited (thanks mom and dad!). Other times they develop as a result of a weakening of the posterior tibial tendon due to age-related wear and tear, physical activity, and overpronation. Those who are overweight or obese are more likely to develop flat feet.

Should I be concerned about my child’s flat feet?

The arches of the feet develop during childhood, so it’s not normal for your baby or toddler to have arches. Their flat feet are perfectly normal and nothing to worry about. Arches typically won’t form until your child is two or three years old, and some children won’t develop arches until the age of five.

What are some ways to treat flat feet?

If you aren’t experiencing any symptoms then there is no reason to seek treatment for your flat feet; however, if you are dealing with foot pain, particularly around the heel or arches of the foot, then you should talk with your podiatrist about ways to ease your pain and prevent further flare-ups. Some conservative ways to treat flat feet include,
  • Wearing properly fitted shoes that provide ample cushioning and support for the entire foot, particularly the arches and heel
  • Consider getting prescription orthotics from your podiatrist, which can evenly distribute the weight throughout the foot rather than putting added pressure on the arches or heel
  • Losing weight, if the patient is overweight or obese
  • Taking pain relievers such as ibuprofen, which can reduce pain and swelling
  • Talking to your podiatrist about special exercises that you can do to improve the strength and function of the ligaments, tendons, and muscles of the foot to reduce pain
  • Weighing the pros and cons of surgical intervention
Fallen arches and flat feet can impact a person’s ability to walk or run. If you are dealing with pain and other issues due to flat feet, a podiatrist can provide you with simple solutions to ease discomfort and improve how your feet function as a whole.

Pediatric Flatfoot

What Is Pediatric Flatfoot?PedFlat03.jpg
Flatfoot is common in both children and adults. When this deformity occurs in children, it is referred to as “pediatric flatfoot.” Although there are various forms of flatfoot, they all share one characteristic – partial or total collapse of the arch.Pediatric flatfoot can be classified as symptomatic or asymptomatic. Symptomatic flatfeet exhibit symptoms such as pain and limitation of activity, while asymptomatic flatfeet show no symptoms. These classifications can assist your foot and ankle surgeon in determining an appropriate treatment plan. Flat feet can affect athletic performance as well. 

Symptoms
Flatfoot can be apparent at birth or it may not show up until years later. Most children with flatfoot have no symptoms, but some have one or more of the following symptoms:

-Pain, tenderness, or cramping in the foot, leg, and knee

-Outward tilting of the heel

-Awkwardness or changes in walking

-Difficulty with shoes

-Reduced energy when participating in physical activities

-Voluntary withdrawal from physical activities

-some parents describe lazy children

-asking to be carried more often

Diagnosis

In diagnosing flatfoot, the foot and ankle surgeon examines the foot and observes how it looks when the child stands and sits. The surgeon also observes how the child walks and evaluates the range of motion of the foot. Because flatfoot is sometimes related to problems in the leg, the surgeon may also examine the knee and hip.

X-rays are often taken to determine the severity of the deformity. Sometimes additional imaging and other tests are ordered

  PedFlat01.jpg .PedFlat02.jpg

Non-surgical Treatment
If a child has no symptoms, treatment is often not required. Instead, the condition will be observed and re-evaluated periodically by the foot and ankle surgeon. The Podiatrist may recommend some at home or proffesional physical therapy exercises for prevention foot condtions. 

Custom orthotic devices may be considered for some cases of asymptomatic flatfoot.

When the child has symptoms, treatment is required. The foot and ankle surgeon may select one or more of the following non-surgical approaches:

-Activity modifications. The child needs to temporarily decrease activities that bring pain as well as avoid prolonged walking or standing.

-Orthotic devices. The foot and ankle surgeon can provide custom orthotic devices that fit inside the shoe to support the structure of the foot and improve function.

-Physical therapy. Stretching exercises, supervised by the foot and ankle surgeon or a physical therapist, provide relief in some cases of flatfoot.

-Medications. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, may be recommended to help reduce pain and inflammation, topical pain relievers may also be recommended. 

-Shoe modifications. The foot and ankle surgeon will advise you on footwear characteristics that are important for the child with flatfoot.

When Is Surgery Needed?
In some cases, surgery is necessary to relieve the symptoms and improve foot function. The surgical procedure or combination of procedures selected for your child will depend on his or her type of flatfoot and degree of deformity.

If you think your child may have flat feet contact our office for a consultation: 972-542-2155

By Advanced Foot and Ankle Center
June 20, 2019
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Flat Feet  

While there are many people with flat feet, often times they won’t even know it; however, there are others with flat feet that regularly experience pain, soreness, and other problems. While flat feet is rarely considered a serious issue, if you are dealing with problems as a result of your flat feet it’s important that you turn to a podiatrist who can offer up ways to prevent problems.

How to tell if you have flat feet

If the arches of your feet touch the floor when you stand then you have flat feet. The arches of our feet don’t actually develop until around the age of six; however, sometimes flat feet develop due to injury or repeated stress on the feet.

Symptoms of flat feet

The most common symptom of flat feet is foot pain that originates in the heels and arches. You may find that the pain gets worse when standing or moving for long periods of time. Those who are physically active may experience pain more regularly. Sometime swelling on the inside of the foot or ankle may also occur.

Potential complications of flat feet

Since flat feet can be responsible for misalignments, this can lead to ankle and knee problems. If you are noticing foot, ankle, knee, hip, or lower back pain then you will want to schedule an appointment with a podiatrist to find out what’s going on.

Treating flat feet

If you aren’t experiencing pain or other issues then you won’t require any treatment for your flat feet. While we can’t fix flat feet our podiatrist can provide you with simple solutions to reduce pain and discomfort associated with faulty biomechanics within the feet. Common ways to prevent flat foot-related pain include:

  • Using arch supports in your shoes, which can take pressure off the arches and provide cushioning and support when standing or moving.
  • Performing certain stretching exercises prescribed by a podiatrist. There are specific exercises designed to stretch the Achilles tendon to alleviate and prevent foot pain.
  • Wearing the appropriate footwear that provides further arch support. Shoes that are old and worn, as well as certain styles such as sandals or flip-flops won’t provide your feet with the proper support they need.
  • Undergoing physical therapy if you are dealing with foot pain due to overuse injuries, which is common among athletes. Physical therapy can help strengthen certain ligaments, tendons and muscles of the feet and ankles to prevent excessive wear and tear, as well as pain and soreness in the arches and heels.

If you are dealing with pain due to flat feet and can’t seem to get your discomfort under control then you will want to talk with a podiatrist who can recommend certain exercises, proper footwear, and custom orthotics to improve the health of your feet. Talk to a podiatrist today.

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
November 13, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Flat Feet  

Flat feet can be a painful and serious foot problem. Flat feet is when a person's entire sole touches the floor when standing. This can be problematic for many individuals, which is why your McKinney and Prosper, TX, podiatrists, Dr. Eric Silvers, Dr. Christopher Witt and Dr. Dustin Lloyd are here to help!

Flat FeetFlat Feet Symptoms

Flat feet are usually painful when someone is playing sports or doing any sort of walking activity. According to the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society, older individuals may develop flat feet with time, especially mild flat feet. However, even mild flat feet are dangerous, as they can collapse into severe flat feet.

Causes and Diagnoses of Flat Feet

Symptoms of flat feet manifest during late childhood. If a toddler or young child experiences foot pain, you may need to visit your McKinney and Prosper podiatrists.

There are several causes for flat feet. They may be congenital or acquired due to tissue breaking down. Tendons, ligaments, and worn out joints may also contribute to the problem, as well as tarsal coalition, which is a separation of the foot bones.

In order to get a proper diagnosis, podiatrists use several tools and tests to assess feet—a physical examination, x-rays, and an MRI examination may be needed.

There are several treatment options, some invasive and others less invasive. Here are a few:

  • In-shoe orthotics
  • Physical therapy
  • Braces, if simple measures fail to provide relief
  • Painful flat feet that don't respond to non-operative measures may require surgery
  • Custom-molded arches in orthotics, usually made to relieve pain and provide support
  • Shoe inserts to walk comfortably

Consultation

If you have any questions or concerns about flat feet, you should contact your McKinney and Prosper, TX, podiatrists, Dr. Eric Silvers, Dr. Christopher Witt and Dr. Dustin Lloyd at (972) 542-2155. They have the expertise to help figure out and treat your foot issue.

What are Shin Splints?

Shin splints is a phrase used to describe multiple issues causing pain in the front part of the lower leg primarily when exercising.  All the conditions it describes are similar however not identical in treatment.  The conditions can include: stress fracture of the tibia, exercise-induced compartment syndrome, muscle, ligament, or tendon injury and periostitis.  Most commonly this condition is seen in runners.

What are the causes of Shin Splints?

Many times the causes of shin splints can be a biomechanical issue.  This means that the way your body is moving is placing extra stress on the lower leg causing the pain.  Overpronation is one of the most common causes of shin splints.  This is when the foot rolls inward causing the arch to flatten when we are walking or running.  This rolling movement of the foot causes rotation through the shin bone increasing the stresses and tension on the bone and muscles that attach to it.  Tight calf muscles or equinus also may cause these movement patterns creating extra stresses on the shin bone and the muscles that attach to it.  Other biomechanical issues that may cause shin splints include, weak hip muscles.  This is especially seen in female runners.  Stress fractures of the shin bone can occur with repetitive stress on the bone especially if running on hard surfaces such as concrete.  Exercise-induced compartment syndrome occurs when the muscles increase in size during exercise due to the increase in blood flow to them.  Each group of muscles is wrapped in a saran wrap like layer of tissue and if they increase too much in size they can actually cause loss of blood flow to the area causing pain and sometimes numbness.

Do shin splints need to be seen by a doctor?

The shin is very susceptible to injury especially in active individuals.  Shin splints may start out more as a nuisance however, if the cause of your pain is not properly addressed it can become progressive and very painful.  Many times if the biomechanical problems are not addressed the condition will require you to stop participation in your activities in order to improve.

How do you treat shin splints?

Many times shin splint require only conservative treatments.  It is important for a biomechanical exam to be performed by your Podiatrist to evaluate your gait and leg mechanics.  Orthotic therapy, if indicated, allows custom devices to be placed in the shoes to help prevent overpronation and thus prevent the inward rolling of the foot which may be causing the shin splints.  Temporary taping of the foot or ankle in the early stages can improve symptoms.  Icing the area after activity also can improve inflammation.  Prescription anti-inflammatory medications can improve the pain.  Rest and elevation of the leg.  Changing shoe gear to more appropriate shoes for your specific activity and foot type.  Changing activity and cross training can prevent the pounding stresses on the shin.

The doctors at Advanced Foot and Ankle Center are well trained and experienced in treating shin splints and evaluating the possible biomechanical problems that can cause shin splints.  Please call today for an appointment.

972-542-2155

Eric M. Silvers, DPM
Dustin M. Lloyd, DPM

Christopher S. WItt, DPM