Advanced Foot and Ankle Center Blog

Posts for category: Foot Conditions

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
August 08, 2019
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Athlete's Foot  

Do you have an itchy rash between your toes? You may have athlete's foot. Your McKinney & Prosper, TX, podiatrists, Drs. Eric Silvers, Doctor footDustin Lloyd, and Christopher Witt of Advanced Foot and Ankle Center offer treatments that stop the itch and other athlete's foot symptoms.

 

Do you have any of these athlete's foot signs and symptoms?

You may have athlete's foot if you have any of these symptoms:

  • Rash: A red rash forms between your toes and may eventually spread to the soles of your feet. Blisters that weep and ooze may also appear between your toes or on your feet. In fact, the area between your toes may feel constantly moist.
  • Swelling and Inflammation: Your rash may appear red and puffy.
  • Itching and Other Symptoms: Itching, burning, and stinging sensations often accompany the rash.
  • Skin Changes: Cracking, peeling skin can occur if you don't treat athlete's foot as soon as you notice signs of the infection.
  • Foul Odor: The infection can also cause an unpleasant odor.

 

But I'm not an athlete! How did I get athlete's foot?

You don't have to play a sport to get athlete's foot. The fungus that causes the infection is very contagious. You can pick it up if you walk barefoot in a public locker room, shower room, or swimming area. The fungal infection can also spread between members of the same household.

 

What can I do to treat the infection?

It's a good idea to visit your McKinney, TX, & Prosper, TX, foot doctor if you still have athlete's foot after using over-the-counter anti-fungal products. Call your podiatrist as soon as you notice signs of athlete's foot if you have diabetes.

Your podiatrist can prescribe a topical medication that's strong enough to penetrate the deeper layers of your skin where the infection lurks.

A visit to the foot doctor can end your athlete's foot symptoms. Call your McKinney, TX, & Prosper, TX, podiatrists, Drs. Eric Silvers, Dustin Lloyd, and Christopher Witt of Advanced Foot and Ankle Center, at (972) 542-2155 to schedule an appointment.

By Advanced Foot and Ankle Center
May 30, 2019
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Neuroma  

What Are Neuromas?

You might be walking along and feel pain near the ball of your foot, like there’s a rock inside your shoe. If the ache stays with you, a condition called neuroma might be the cause. A neuroma is a growth of nerve tissue frequently found between the third and fourth toes. Led by Dr. Silvers, Dr. Witt, and Dr. Lloyd, Advanced Foot and Ankle Center (offices in Prosper and McKinney, TX) offers treatments for neuromas. Here's all you need to know about neuromas.

Causes of Neuromas: Neuromas can have numerous causes. Some common causes of neuromas include: genetics, ill-fitting shoes, rheumatoid arthritis or gout, repetitive trauma, and pregnancy. Neuromas can also be caused by biomechanical problems, such as a bunion or foot pronation.

Symptoms of Neuromas: Normally, there are no outward signs, such as a lump, because a neuroma is not really a tumor. A neuroma is a painful condition. There may be a sharp, burning pain or numbness in your toes or ball of your foot.

Diagnosis of Neuromas: At your appointment, your podiatrist in McKinney will perform a physical examination. Your podiatrist will order x-rays or other imaging tests to confirm a diagnosis. X-rays may be required to rule out a fracture or arthritis of the joints that join the toes to the foot. X-rays alone will not show whether or not a neuroma is present, so an ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging test may be done to confirm a diagnosis.

Treatment of Neuromas: People with neuromas may need to take painkillers, change their footwear, or get steroid injections. Prescription orthotics can help reduce pressure on the nerve and relieve your pain. In some cases, surgery may be required to remove the affected nerve or release the pressure on it. Surgery is an effective treatment for neuromas.

Save yourself from pain! Don't delay- call Advanced Foot and Ankle Center at (972) 542-2155 right now to schedule a consultation with one of our podiatrists in Prosper or McKinney, TX. Get your life back on track by receiving the best neuroma treatment available. We will help you cure your pain fast!

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
April 19, 2019
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Ingrown Nails  

Swelling, reddened flesh, shooting pain, and pus are just some of the incredibly uncomfortable symptoms of having an ingrown toenail. Although this condition can sometimes be successfully treated through home remedies, ingrown toenails often progress to the point of infection, a point that then requires professional treatment. Read on to learn what causes this problem, when it’s right to seek medical help, and how our podiatrists can help get your foot back to a healthy state!

The Causes and Symptoms

Before we cover how to treat ingrown toenails, let’s first review the core causes and symptoms that hallmark this condition…

Ingrown toenails initially develop due to a few different factors, including:

  • Cutting the toenail too short
  • Rounding the toenail during grooming
  • Wearing improperly fitting shoes
  • Experiencing toe trauma

If the flesh on the side of the toe has become red, swollen, and tender, you likely have an ingrown toenail. If you have caught this problem while it’s still in its early stages, you can try implementing some of the home remedies listed in the next section. However, if your toe is exhibiting some of the following signs of infection, you should seek professional podiatric help:

  • Pervasive shooting or throbbing toe pain
  • Regular bleeding
  • The presence of a pus-filled blister
  • The skin has started growing over the nail

Home Remedies

As mentioned above, if an ingrown toenail is caught before infection sets in, there are a few different methods that you can practice at home in order to clear up the issue. Some of these include:

  • Around 3 to 4 times a day, submerge your foot into warm water for 15 to 20 minutes. Regularly doing this should reduce swelling and provide pain relief.
  • Following each soaking, use cotton to separate the ingrown toenail from the flesh that it is starting to grow under. This should allow the nail to grow above the skin again.
  • Avoid snug or constraining shoes.

If these actions fail to clear up the problem in 2 to 3 days, you should pursue professional treatment.

Professional Treatments

In the case of a severe or recurring infection, there are a few different procedures that your podiatrist can perform to make your toe healthy again. Depending on the specifics of your ingrown toenail, one of the following treatments may be recommended:

  • Partial Nail Removal: In the case of a severe ingrown toenail, your doctor can numb your toe before physically removing the ingrown portion of the nail.
  • Nail and Tissue Removal: If the same toe is repeatedly experiencing the same ingrown toenail problem, this procedure can be performed to prevent future recurrences. It entails your podiatrist removing a portion of the underlying nail bed, thus preventing the nail from become ingrown again.

Concerned About Your Toe? Give Us a Call!

If your ingrown toenail needs medical attention, call our podiatric office today!

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
February 07, 2019
Category: Foot Conditions

Heel pain is one of the most common complaints a podiatrist hears about from patients. If you are dealing with heel pain above the heel bone then you could be dealing with Achilles Tendonitis, a result of overuse. The Achilles tendon is the longest tendon in the body and it serves to connect the muscles of the calf with the lower leg and heel bone.

While Achilles Tendonitis tends to occur most often in runners, this condition can still occur in athletes that play certain sports such as soccer or tennis. Unfortunately, this tendon does weaken as we get older, which makes at an increased risk for developing this overuse injury as we age.

 

What are the symptoms of Achilles Tendonitis?

The most obvious symptom of Achilles Tendonitis is pain above the heel bone. When the pain first appears it’s usually pretty mild and you may only notice it after running; however, over time you may notice that the pain gets worse after certain exercises. Along with pain you may also experience stiffness or tenderness in the heel, especially in the morning or after long periods of sitting.

 

When should I see a podiatrist?

If this is the first time that you’ve ever experienced heel pain then it’s a good idea to turn to a foot doctor who can determine whether Achilles Tendonitis is causing your symptoms or whether it’s something else. If you’re experiencing chronic heel pain around the Achilles tendon it’s also a good time to see a doctor. If the pain is severe or you are unable to put weight on your foot it’s possible that you might be dealing with a ruptured tendon, which requires immediate attention.

 

How do you treat Achilles Tendonitis?

In most cases, Achilles Tendonitis can be treated with simple self-care options. Unless symptoms are severe you may be able to treat your heel pain by:

  • Taking over-the-counter pain medications
  • Avoiding high-impact activities or activities that exacerbate symptoms
  • Elevating the foot to reduce swelling
  • Performing stretching exercises or undergoing physical therapy
  • Icing the heel
  • Wearing custom orthotics
  • Replacing worn-out shoes, especially running shoes

Surgery is only necessary if your symptoms aren’t responding to any other nonsurgical treatment options after several months or if the tendon is torn.

 

If you think your heel pain could be the result of Achilles Tendonitis then it’s time to turn to a podiatrist as soon as possible. A podiatrist can provide you with a variety of treatment options, from simple lifestyle modifications to custom orthotics.

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
January 15, 2019
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: heel pain  

Find out when your heel pain may require additional treatment from a medical expert.

Is heel pain keeping you from lacing up your sneakers and taking your morning run? If so, you may be dealing with an inflammatory problem known as plantar fasciitis. This is a problem that plagues a lot of athletes, especially runners. If you are dealing with heel pain, find out when you should turn to our Prosper and McKinney, TX, podiatrists, Dr. Eric Silvers, Dr. Dustin Lloyd and Dr. Christopher Witt for care.

 

What is plantar fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis refers to a condition that affects the plantar fascia, a thick grouping of tissue that runs the length of the feet from the toes to the heels. If the fascia has been overworked or overstretched, it can lead to irritation or inflammation, which in turn causes the heel pain you are now experiencing.

 

What causes plantar fasciitis?

Often times, faulty biomechanics are to blame for plantar fasciitis, as those with very high arches or flat feet are more likely to develop the condition. Of course, if you wear worn-out shoes or shoes that don't offer enough support this can put extra strain and pressure on the plantar fascia, which can lead to heel pain. This is why it’s very important for athletes to replace their sneakers every few months or when the treads start to wear out.

 

How do I know that I have plantar fasciitis?

Since there are other conditions that can cause heel pain, if this is your first time experiencing the discomfort, it might be a good idea to visit our foot doctors in either Prosper or McKinney, TX, for a proper diagnosis. Common symptoms of plantar fasciitis include,

  • Pain that starts at the base of the heel
  • Pain in the arches of the foot
  • Pain that is worse when getting up in the morning
  • Pain that eases up as you move throughout the day
  • Pain that is exacerbated by working out

The thing about plantar fasciitis-related heel pain is that the pain is often worse in the morning when first getting up, but may dissipate throughout the day as the tissues warm up. Of course, this doesn’t mean that it’s safe for you to workout or go for a run. While the pain may not be present when running or working out, it will often return immediately after.

If you’ve dealt with heel pain before, you may be able to just handle the issue on your own with simple home treatments and rest; however, if you find that your heel pain is getting worse or isn’t responding to at-home care, then it’s time to call us to schedule an evaluation.

 

Give us a call!

Advanced Foot and Ankle Center has offices in both Prosper and McKinney, TX, to better serve you. If you are dealing with severe, persistent or stubborn heel pain then give us a call today at (972) 542-2155 to find out how we can help you.