Advanced Foot and Ankle Center Blog

Posts for category: Foot Conditions

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
January 15, 2019
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: heel pain  

Find out when your heel pain may require additional treatment from a medical expert.

Is heel pain keeping you from lacing up your sneakers and taking your morning run? If so, you may be dealing with an inflammatory problem known as plantar fasciitis. This is a problem that plagues a lot of athletes, especially runners. If you are dealing with heel pain, find out when you should turn to our Prosper and McKinney, TX, podiatrists, Dr. Eric Silvers, Dr. Dustin Lloyd and Dr. Christopher Witt for care.

 

What is plantar fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis refers to a condition that affects the plantar fascia, a thick grouping of tissue that runs the length of the feet from the toes to the heels. If the fascia has been overworked or overstretched, it can lead to irritation or inflammation, which in turn causes the heel pain you are now experiencing.

 

What causes plantar fasciitis?

Often times, faulty biomechanics are to blame for plantar fasciitis, as those with very high arches or flat feet are more likely to develop the condition. Of course, if you wear worn-out shoes or shoes that don't offer enough support this can put extra strain and pressure on the plantar fascia, which can lead to heel pain. This is why it’s very important for athletes to replace their sneakers every few months or when the treads start to wear out.

 

How do I know that I have plantar fasciitis?

Since there are other conditions that can cause heel pain, if this is your first time experiencing the discomfort, it might be a good idea to visit our foot doctors in either Prosper or McKinney, TX, for a proper diagnosis. Common symptoms of plantar fasciitis include,

  • Pain that starts at the base of the heel
  • Pain in the arches of the foot
  • Pain that is worse when getting up in the morning
  • Pain that eases up as you move throughout the day
  • Pain that is exacerbated by working out

The thing about plantar fasciitis-related heel pain is that the pain is often worse in the morning when first getting up, but may dissipate throughout the day as the tissues warm up. Of course, this doesn’t mean that it’s safe for you to workout or go for a run. While the pain may not be present when running or working out, it will often return immediately after.

If you’ve dealt with heel pain before, you may be able to just handle the issue on your own with simple home treatments and rest; however, if you find that your heel pain is getting worse or isn’t responding to at-home care, then it’s time to call us to schedule an evaluation.

 

Give us a call!

Advanced Foot and Ankle Center has offices in both Prosper and McKinney, TX, to better serve you. If you are dealing with severe, persistent or stubborn heel pain then give us a call today at (972) 542-2155 to find out how we can help you.

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
December 07, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Sesamoid   Sesamoiditis  

What is Sesamoiditis?

Sesamoids are small bones that are only connected to tendons or surrounded in muscle. This only appears in a few places in the body, one of which is the foot. Two very tiny sesamoids are found in the underside of the foot near the big toe. One is on the outer side of the foot and the other bone is close to the middle of the foot. This structure provides a smooth surface for the tendons to slide over, which helps the tendons move muscles. They help with weight bearing and also help to elevate the bones of the big toe. So now that you know what sesamoids are, you might be wondering what sesamoiditis is and what its symptoms are.

Sesamoiditis

Just like any other bone, sesamoids can unfortunately fracture. The tendons surrounding the sesamoids may also become irritated or inflamed and this is what sesamoiditis is. Sesamoiditis is also a form of tendonitis and is a common condition among ballerinas, runners, and baseball catchers due to the pressure that is constantly placed on their feet.

Symptoms of Sesamoiditis

Symptoms of Sesamoiditis may include:

  • Pain under the big toe or ball of the foot
  • Swelling and/or bruising
  • Difficulty in bending and straightening the big toe

Treating Sesamoiditis

Treatments include:

  • Resting and stopping any activity that could be causing pain and inflammation
  • Anti-inflammatories, such as ibuprofen and aspirin only after consulting your physician
  • Icing the sole of the foot
  • Wearing soft-soled and low-heeled shoes
  • Cushioning inserts in the shoes

If symptoms persist after treatments, you may need to wear a removable brace for 4-6 weeks to help the bones heal. Call your podiatrist today to ask any questions about sesamoiditis and get on your way to pain-free feet once again!

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
November 13, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Flat Feet  

Flat feet can be a painful and serious foot problem. Flat feet is when a person's entire sole touches the floor when standing. This can be problematic for many individuals, which is why your McKinney and Prosper, TX, podiatrists, Dr. Eric Silvers, Dr. Christopher Witt and Dr. Dustin Lloyd are here to help!

Flat FeetFlat Feet Symptoms

Flat feet are usually painful when someone is playing sports or doing any sort of walking activity. According to the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society, older individuals may develop flat feet with time, especially mild flat feet. However, even mild flat feet are dangerous, as they can collapse into severe flat feet.

Causes and Diagnoses of Flat Feet

Symptoms of flat feet manifest during late childhood. If a toddler or young child experiences foot pain, you may need to visit your McKinney and Prosper podiatrists.

There are several causes for flat feet. They may be congenital or acquired due to tissue breaking down. Tendons, ligaments, and worn out joints may also contribute to the problem, as well as tarsal coalition, which is a separation of the foot bones.

In order to get a proper diagnosis, podiatrists use several tools and tests to assess feet—a physical examination, x-rays, and an MRI examination may be needed.

There are several treatment options, some invasive and others less invasive. Here are a few:

  • In-shoe orthotics
  • Physical therapy
  • Braces, if simple measures fail to provide relief
  • Painful flat feet that don't respond to non-operative measures may require surgery
  • Custom-molded arches in orthotics, usually made to relieve pain and provide support
  • Shoe inserts to walk comfortably

Consultation

If you have any questions or concerns about flat feet, you should contact your McKinney and Prosper, TX, podiatrists, Dr. Eric Silvers, Dr. Christopher Witt and Dr. Dustin Lloyd at (972) 542-2155. They have the expertise to help figure out and treat your foot issue.

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
August 16, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Poor Circulation  

Are you experiencing numbness, tingling, or discolorations in your feet?

Even though poor circulation isn’t a condition, if you are experiencing poor circulation in your feet this is often a symptom of a much larger issue. This is why it’s important to understand the warning signs of poor circulation and when to see a podiatrist, as many of these conditions can be serious or cause further complications to your health.

Causes of Poor Circulation

There are many reasons why someone may have poor circulation. The most common conditions include:

1. Peripheral artery disease (PAD)

This causes poor circulation in the legs due to a narrowing in the arteries and blood vessels. Over time this condition can cause damage to nerves or tissue. While this condition can occur in younger people, particularly smokers, it’s more common for people over 50 years old to develop PAD.

2. Blood Clots

A blood clot causes a block or restriction in blood flow and can develop anywhere in the body. The most common places for a blood clot include the arms or the legs, which can lead to symptoms of poor circulation. In some cases, a blood clot can cause serious complications such as a stroke.

3. Diabetes

While this condition does affect blood sugar levels, it is also known to affect circulation within the body. Those with circulation issues may experience cramping in the legs that may get worse when you are active. Those with diabetic neuropathy may experience nerve damage in the legs and feet, as well as numbness or tingling.

4. Raynaud’s Disease

A less common condition, Raynaud’s disease causes chronic cold fingers and feet due to the narrowing of the arteries in the hands and toes. Since these arteries are narrow it’s more difficult for blood to flow to these areas, leading to poor circulation. Of course, you may experience these symptoms in other parts of the body besides your toes or fingers, such as your nose, ears, or lips.

Warning Signs of Poor Circulation

You may be experiencing poor circulation in your feet if you are experiencing these symptoms:

  • Numbness
  • Pain that may radiate into the limbs
  • Tingling (a “pins and needles” sensation)
  • Muscle cramping

If you are experiencing symptoms of poor circulation that don’t go away it’s best to play it safe rather than sorry and turn to a podiatric specialist who can provide a proper diagnosis and determine the best approach for improving circulation. Don’t ignore this issue.

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
July 06, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Hammertoes  

When most people think about foot deformities they most often think about bunions; however, hammertoes are just as common. This unassuming deformity comes about gradually, so you may not even notice it until it’s too late. “What is a hammertoe?” You might be wondering. A hammertoe affects the middle joint of a toe (often the smaller toes), causing the toe to bend downward. In severe cases, a hammertoe will look almost claw-like.

There are two kinds of hammertoes: flexible and rigid. As you might imagine, a flexible hammertoe is one in which you can still straighten the toe out. If you aren’t able to straighten the affected toe then this is a rigid hammertoe. A flexible hammertoe isn’t as serious as a rigid one; however, it’s important that you take care of your hammertoe to make sure that it doesn’t get worse.

While there is no way to cure a hammertoe there are simple measures you can take to prevent it from progressing. First and foremost, you need to take a look at the shoes you are wearing and make sure that they aren’t too tight. When you slip your feet into your shoes, does it cause your toes to bunch up against one another? If so then this could make your hammertoe worse.

Instead, opt for shoes with an ample toe box, which will allow your toes to wiggle and move around freely. If you have a structural imbalance within the foot this can leave you prone to foot problems such as hammertoes and bunions. To correct this imbalance, talk to your foot doctor about getting custom orthotics (shoe inserts), which can be placed into your shoes to help provide cushioning, support, and shock absorption for your feet.

If pain or stiffness does rear its ugly head you can choose to take an over-the-counter pain reliever like ibuprofen, which can tackle both pain and inflammation in one fell swoop, or you can place a towel-wrapped ice pack (never put ice directly on the skin, as it can cause severe burns) over the area for several minutes.

Just as you can buy pads to cover a bunion or callus, you can also buy a non-medicated protective pad to cover over a hammertoe. Since the deformed toe joint juts out this can leave the toe prone to calluses, which can cause pain when wearing shoes. To prevent a callus from forming, you can apply a protective pad over the deformed toe joint before putting on shoes.

Of course, if you are dealing with significant or frequent pain, or if the hammertoe is rigid, then you will want to turn to a podiatric specialist. In severe cases, surgery may be recommended to correct the disfigured joint.