Advanced Foot and Ankle Center Blog

Posts for category: Foot Conditions

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
January 27, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: heel pain  

Suffering from Heel Pain?

If you spend long hours on your feet you know just how difficult heel pain can be. The problem with heel pain is that it can be exacerbated by walking for long periods and other related factors. You can often manage some of the symptoms at home with simple remedies, but for long-lasting relief, you can depend on your podiatrist. To learn more, reach out to the professionals of the Advanced Foot and Ankle Center in McKinney, TX, and Prosper, TX.

Plantar Fasciitis

A very common cause for heel pain is plantar fasciitis, a condition that affects the thick ligament that runs across the bottom of your feet. The pain is most pronounced upon waking and after periods of rest. Walking around, stretching it, can often ease the discomfort but it often returns.

The most common causes relate to the structure of your foot, primarily the arches. If the shoes you wear do not support them it can exacerbate your symptoms. So does anything that puts further strain on them, such as working on your feet for long hours on flat surfaces and obesity and overuse.

Heel Pain Treatment in McKinney, TX, and Prosper, TX

Over the counter medication can help with the inflammation. As well as applying ice, though making sure not to have it make direct contact with the skin.

Stretching exercises can provide further relief, specifically those that stretch the calf muscles.

But during this time one of the most important things you can do is rest, especially when you first encounter the condition.

But if you see no improvement and if the pain is making difficult your everyday activities, it's time to contact your podiatrist.

They can prescribe custom orthotic devices to help properly support your arches, night splints to stretch the fascia as you sleep, and possibly corticosteroid injections, but everything depends on your specific situation.

So come into the office to find out how your podiatrist can help you find relief from heel pain. Make an appointment today with the experts of Advanced Foot and Ankle Center in McKinney, TX, and Prosper, TX, by dialing (972) 542-2155.

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
January 18, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Sprain   Fractured Foot   Broken Bone  
Did I Break My FootWhether you took a bad tumble or your child had a rough collision while playing sports, it’s important that you do not just recognize the signs of a broken foot but that you also seek immediate medical attention. Of course, we know that it isn’t always easy to differentiate a break from a sprain. Here are some signs that your foot is broken and need to be seen by a qualified podiatrist,
  • Pain that occurs immediately after an injury or accident
  • Pain that is directly above a bone
  • Pain that is worse with movement
  • Bruising and severe swelling
  • A cracking sound at the moment of injury
  • A visible deformity or bump
  • Can’t put weight on the injured foot
If you or your child is experiencing symptoms of a fractured foot or ankle they must turn to a podiatrist for care. We can diagnose, set, and treat all types of fractures; however, if the bone is dislocated or looks severely broken (a visible bump or deformity appears on the foot) it’s a good idea to head to your local ER.
 
How can I tell the difference between a break and a sprain?

The symptoms of a sprain are far less severe. You can often put weight on the injured foot with a sprain; however, you may notice some slight pain and stiffness. You may also have heard a popping sound at the moment of the injury with a sprain, while a broken bone often produces a cracking sound. The pain associated with a sprain will also be above soft tissue rather than bone. A podiatrist will perform an X-ray to be able to determine if you are dealing with a break or a sprain.
 
How is a broken bone in the foot treated?

Rest is key to allowing an injury, particularly a fracture, to heal properly. Along with rest, your doctor may also recommend either an over-the-counter or prescription-strength pain reliever, depending on the severity of your fracture. Those with more moderate to severe fractures may require a special boot, brace, or splint. Those with more severe fractures may need to wear a cast and use crutches, so they can avoid putting any weight on the foot.
 
If you are on the fence about whether or not to see a podiatrist about your injury, why not simply give us a call? We can discuss your symptoms on the phone to determine whether we can take a wait-and-see approach or whether you need to come in right away for care.
By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
December 16, 2020
Category: Foot Conditions
How Rheumatoid Arthritis Affects the FeetRheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common types of arthritis, and it is characterized by joint pain, inflammation, and damage. RA, like other kinds of arthritis, is progressive, which means that symptoms will gradually get worse over time if left untreated. So, how do you know if you might be developing RA in your feet? While a podiatrist can certainly provide you with a definitive diagnosis, here are some telltale signs of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • You experience pain, inflammation, and stiffness in the joints of the foot, particularly the toes
  • You experience aching feet, particularly after activity or long periods of standing
  • Some parts of your foot may feel oddly warm to the touch or may emanate heat while the rest of the foot feels normal
  • The joints of the toes and ankles may swell
Symptoms are often mild at first and you may not even think that you have arthritis. Those between the ages of 30 to 60 are more likely to develop RA. You may notice intense flare-ups that are characterized by bouts of remission (in which you don’t experience symptoms). Do not take these symptom-free moments to mean that you are fine. It’s important to see a podiatrist right away if you are experiencing any of the symptoms above.

What does RA do to the feet and ankles?

Along with painful joints and stiffness, you may also notice other changes to your feet over time. Some of these changes include,
  • Bunions
  • Corns
  • Hammertoes and claw toes
  • Bursitis
  • Circulation issues (e.g. atherosclerosis; Raynaud’s phenomena)
How is rheumatoid arthritis treated?

Since RA is not curable, your podiatrist will focus on crafting a treatment plan that will help to alleviate your symptoms and slow the progression of the disease to prevent severe and irreparable joint damage. Prescription medications known as disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are biologics that can reduce inflammation and prevent the progression of the disease.

Of course, there are also lifestyle changes you can make along with taking prescription medication that can also ease symptoms,
  • Warm soaks
  • Custom insoles or orthotics
  • Pain relievers
  • Compression
  • Stretching exercises for the feet
  • Bracing
  • Steroid injections (for targeting severe inflammation)
Surgery is only necessary if there is severe joint or cartilage damage, or if inflamed tissue needs to be removed from around the joint.

Most people with RA will eventually develop foot and ankle problems, which is why it’s important to have a podiatrist on your team that can help you manage your RA effectively.
By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
October 28, 2020
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Sesamoiditis  
SesamoiditisA sesamoid is a bone that connects to a tendon or muscle instead of another bone. The most common sesamoids are the patella (kneecap) and two bones found under the forefoot. The sesamoids in the foot help to provide the foot with weight-bearing support. Unfortunately, just like another bone, sesamoids can fracture or become inflamed. An inflamed sesamoid is known as sesamoiditis and it’s most often found in athletes.
 
What are the symptoms of sesamoiditis?
 
So, how do you differentiate pain from sesamoiditis from other causes of pain? You could be dealing with an inflamed sesamoid in the foot if you are experiencing:
  • Pain at the ball of the foot near the big toe
  • Pain when bending or straightening the big toe
  • Swelling
  • Pain that comes up gradually
Pain that comes on suddenly may be a sign of a fractured sesamoid rather than sesamoiditis, which is a form of tendinitis. You may experience pain when putting weight on the foot.

How is sesamoiditis treated?

The good news is that this inflammatory condition can be treated with rest and home care designed to ease the inflamed tendon or muscle. At-home care for sesamoiditis looks like:
  • Avoiding any activities that put pressure on the foot
  • Taking a pain reliever such as ibuprofen to reduce pain and swelling
  • Wearing supportive shoes with ample cushioning
  • Applying ice to the foot for 10-15 minutes every few hours
  • Avoiding shoes with pointed toes or high heels
It can take up to six weeks for sesamoiditis pain and inflammation to go away. If you are dealing with severe pain or swelling, or if you have trouble walking, then you must see a podiatrist right away. In more severe cases your doctor may recommend bracing the foot or using steroid injections to target unresponsive and more serious inflammation.

If you are experiencing severe or persistent foot pain, you must seek podiatry care from a qualified foot and ankle specialist. Foot pain should not go ignored. Call your podiatrist today. 
By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
September 04, 2020
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: heel pain  

Heel pain can make it difficult to perform daily activities, such as walking or even standing for too long. Heel pain is often due to a condition known as plantar fasciitis. Without treatment, the pain caused by this condition can become progressively worse over time. Several treatment options are available for alleviating pain and discomfort caused by plantar fasciitis. Our experienced team of podiatrists can develop an individualized treatment plan for your heel pain at Advanced Foot and Ankle Center in McKinney and Prosper, TX.

Heel Pain and Plantar Fasciitis

One of the most common causes of heel pain is a foot condition known as plantar fasciitis. There is a band of tissues known as the plantar fascia that runs along the bottom of the foot and connects the heel bone to the toes. Plantar Fasciitis can develop when this band of tissues becomes inflamed.

Individuals who overpronate when stepping is more likely to develop plantar fasciitis. Overpronating happens when the foot rolls inward with each step. This motion causes the arch of the foot to flatten, which lengthens the band of plantar fascia tissues. As the tissues become overstretched, they can become inflamed. Pain can then develop in the heels and arches of the feet. Without treatment, heel pain caused by plantar fasciitis can worsen over time.

Treatments Options

Several options are available for treating heel pain caused by plantar fasciitis. Some things you can do for minor heel pain include resting the foot, and limiting physical activity until the pain subsides. Anti-inflammatory medications can also be helpful. Reducing inflammation can often lessen or eliminate associated pain. Wearing shoes with plenty of cushioning and support is also beneficial.

In cases of chronic or severe heel pain, medical treatment is best. The skilled podiatrists at our offices in Prosper and McKinney can help your heel pain by developing a treatment plan tailored to your specific needs. Some options for treating heel pain include:

  • Custom Orthotics
  • Physical Therapy
  • Padding and Strapping
  • Corticosteroids
  • Walking Cast
  • Night Splint

When other options have not completely resolved the problem, surgery is sometimes needed. Surgery can be beneficial when a faulty foot structure is contributing to ongoing heel pain. Surgery is also performed to remove painful heel spurs, which are calcium deposits that can develop on the bottom of the heel.

There are many things you can do to alleviate your heel pain. Schedule an appointment with one of our podiatrists to discuss treatment options for your heel pain by calling Advanced Foot and Ankle Center in McKinney, TX at (972) 542-2155. Our office in Prosper, TX can also be reached by calling the same number.