Advanced Foot and Ankle Center Blog
August 25, 2021
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

So there is nothing you can do right?..........Wrong!

Depending on what type of fracture. Some toe fractures need to be set in order to heal correctly. Some toe fractures even require surgery. As with most injuries it is best to treat them early.  If you suspect you have a toe fracture put ice on your foot and minimize the weight on it. Elevate your foot. If the toe is sticking out to the side or up please come in right away. 

Treatment often consists of:

Xrays to determine if there is a fracture and the extent and location of it.

Sometimes there is taping or buddy splinting of the affected toe to another toe.

Often we recommend wearing at least a hard soled shoe, or surgical shoe and boot.

Rest and change of activity.

Fractures typically take 6-8 weeks to heel, in the toes it can take longer. 

"If you had a fracture in your hand,you would never stuff it in a shoe and go running on it"- Dr. Melissa

If you suspect you have a toe fracture, please call us.

Sincerely,

Advanced Foot & Ankle 

972.542.2155

August 24, 2021
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged
Also know as P.A.D. (Peripheral Arterial Disease)
What is Peripheral Arterial Disease?
Commonly referred to as “poor circulation,” Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.) is the restriction of blood flow in the arteries of the leg. When arteries become narrowed by plaque (the accumulation of cholesterol and other materials on the walls of the arteries), the oxygen-rich blood flowing through the arteries cannot reach the legs and feet.
The presence of P.A.D. may be an indication of more widespread arterial disease in the body that can affect the brain, causing stroke, or the heart, causing a heart attack.
Signs and Symptoms
Most people have no symptoms during the early stages of P.A.D. Often, by the time symptoms are noticed, the arteries are already significantly blocked.
Common symptoms of P.A.D. include:
  • Leg pain (cramping) that occurs while walking (intermittent claudication)
  • Leg pain (cramping) that occurs while lying down (rest pain)
  • Leg numbness or weakness
  • Cold legs or feet
  • Sores that won’t heal on toes, feet, or legs
  • A change in leg color
  • Loss of hair on the feet and legs
  • Changes in toenails—color and thickness
If any of these symptoms are present, it is important to discuss them with a foot and ankle surgeon. Left untreated, P.A.D. can lead to debilitating and limb-threatening consequences.
Risk Factors of P.A.D.
Because only half of those with P.A.D. actually experience symptoms, it is important that people with known risk factors be screened or tested for P.A.D.
The risk factors include:
  • Being over age 50
  • Smoking (currently or previously)
  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Personal or family history of P.A.D., heart disease, heart attack, or stroke
  • Sedentary lifestyle (infrequent or no exercise)
Diagnosis of P.A.D.
To diagnose P.A.D., the foot and ankle surgeon obtains a comprehensive medical history of the patient. The surgeon performs a lower extremity physical examination that includes evaluation of pulses, skin condition, and foot deformities to determine the patient’s risk for P.A.D. If risk factors are present, the foot and ankle surgeon may order further tests.
There are non-invasive tests are available to assess P.A.D. The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a simple test in which blood pressure is measured and compared at the arm and ankle levels. An abnormal ABI is a reliable indicator of underlying P.A.D. and may prompt the foot and ankle surgeon to refer the patient to a vascular specialist for additional testing and treatment as necessary.
General Treatment of P.A.D.
Treatment for P.A.D. involves lifestyle changes, medication and, in some cases, surgery.
  • Lifestyle changes. These include smoking cessation, regular exercise, and eating a heart-healthy diet.
  • Medications. Medicines may be used to improve blood flow, help prevent blood clots, or to control blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood glucose levels.
  • Surgery. In some patients, small incision (endovascular) procedures or open (bypass) surgery of the leg are needed to improve blood flow.
P.A.D. and Foot Problems
Simple foot deformities (hammertoes, bunions, bony prominences) or dermatologic conditions such as ingrown or thickened fungal nails often become more serious concerns when P.A.D is present. Because the legs and feet of someone with P.A.D. do not have normal blood flow—and because blood is necessary for healing—seemingly small problems such as cuts, blisters, or sores can result in serious complications.
Having both diabetes and P.A.D. further increases the potential for foot complications. People with diabetes often have neuropathy (nerve damage that can cause numbness in the feet), so they don’t feel pain when foot problems occur. When neuropathy occurs in people with P.A.D., ulcers can develop over foot deformities and may never heal. For this reason, P.A.D. and diabetes are common causes of foot or leg amputations in the United States.
Once detected, P.A.D. may be corrected or at least improved. The foot and ankle surgeon can then correct the underlying foot deformity to prevent future problems should the circulation become seriously restricted again.
Avoiding P.A.D. Complications
Getting regular foot exams—as well as seeking immediate help when you notice changes in the feet—can keep small problems from worsening. P.A.D. requires ongoing attention.
To avoid complications, people with this disease should follow these precautions:
  • Wash your feet daily. Use warm (not hot) water and a mild soap. Dry your feet—including between the toes—gently and well.
  • Keep the skin soft. For dry skin, apply a moisturizer that does not contain alcohol. Apply over the top and bottom of your feet, but not between the toes.
  • Trim toenails straight across and file the edges. Keep edges rounded to avoid ingrown toenails, which can cause infections.
  • Always wear shoes and socks. To avoid cuts and abrasions, never go barefoot—even indoors.
  • Choose the right shoes and socks. When buying new shoes, have an expert make sure they fit well. At first, wear them just for a few hours daily to help prevent blisters and examine the feet afterward to check for areas of irritation. Wear seamless socks to avoid getting sores.
  • Check your feet—every day. Check all over for sores, cuts, bruises, breaks in the skin, rashes, corns, calluses, blisters, red spots, swelling, ingrown toenails, toenail infections, or pain.
  • Call your foot and ankle surgeon. If you develop any of the above problems, seek professional help immediately. Do not try to take care of cuts, sores, or infections yourself
Sincerely,
Advanced Foot & Ankle
972.542.2155
By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
August 19, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Morton’s Neuroma  
Mortons NeuromaAre you experiencing a sharp, burning pain between your toes that gets worse when walking or standing? Do you notice tingling or numbness in the toes, or pain and swelling on the soles of the feet? If so, you could be dealing with a condition known as Morton’s neuroma that causes thickening of the nerves between the toes. If you suspect that you might have Morton’s neuroma, a podiatrist will be the ideal doctor to turn to for treatment.

Are neuromas dangerous?

It’s important not to confuse a neuroma with Morton’s neuroma. A neuroma is a benign growth that develops on the nerves; however, Morton’s neuroma is not a growth; it’s simply inflammation and swelling of the tissue around the nerves that lie between the toes (often between the third and fourth toes).

What causes Morton’s neuroma?

Any kind of intense pressure or compression placed on these toes can lead to inflammation of the tissue around the nerves. Some people are more at risk for developing Morton’s neuroma. Risk factors include:
  • Playing certain sports such as running or tennis, which puts pressure on the balls of the feet
  • Wearing high heels with a heel that’s more than 2 inches tall
  • Wearing narrow shoes or shoes with pointed toes
  • Certain foot conditions such as bunions or hammertoes
  • Flat feet or high arches (or other congenital foot problems)
What are the signs of Morton’s neuroma?

Since this condition involves inflamed tissue, you won’t notice a growth or bump in the area; however, you may simply experience pain that is gradual and minor at first and is alleviated by not wearing shoes. Symptoms often get worse with time and result in:
  • Swelling between the toes
  • A sharp burning pain between the toes that gets worse with activity
  • Tingling or numbness in the foot
  • Feeling like there is a pebble or stone in your shoe (often at the balls of the feet)
  • Pain that’s intensified by standing on your tiptoes or wearing high heels or pointed-toe shoes
How is this foot problem treated?

Most people can alleviate their symptoms through simple lifestyle modifications including:
  • Icing
  • Rest
  • Massaging your feet
  • Shoe pads
  • Custom shoe inserts (that a podiatrist can craft just for you)
  • Supportive footwear that offers shock-absorption
  • Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Steroid injections
  • Local anesthetic injections
Any persistent or severe foot pain or swelling, along with numbness or tingling, should be addressed right away by a podiatrist. There are many conditions, some serious, that can cause a lot of these same symptoms and a podiatrist will be able to provide an immediate and accurate diagnosis for your symptoms.
By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
July 29, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Footwear   Shoes  
The Right ShoesWhen was the last time you bought new shoes? When was the last time you threw out shoes that were old and worn out? We often keep shoes long past the point where we should have retired them. Of course, other factors such as our age also play a role in the health of our feet, including our risk factors for developing certain conditions and also our footcare needs. Our feet have different needs and require different care as we get older. Here’s how to choose the appropriate shoes for all stages of life:
 
How Your Feet Change Over the Years

As we age, our feet will change shape and size, which can also predispose them to certain problems. This also means that your foot needs will change, particularly concerning footwear. Here’s how your feet will change:
  • Loss of fat pads
  • Dry, cracked skin
  • The development or worsening of certain deformities such as hammertoes or bunions
  • Widening or lengthening of the feet
  • Loss of bone density (which can increase your risk for fracture)
  • Changes in gait due to certain conditions such as neuropathy or arthritis
  • Diabetic-related foot problems
  • Issues with balance
Everyday Footwear for Aging Feet

You must look for shoes that provide proper cushioning and supportive insoles so that your feet can tackle the day-to-day activities. If you have foot problems or issues with gait, then you’ll want to turn to a podiatrist for an evaluation. Together, you can decide the proper footwear and whether prescription orthotics can also provide your feet with additional support and cushioning that footwear alone can’t.

You should turn to a specialty shoe store where they can analyze your gait, properly measure your feet, and determine whether the shoes you’re getting may require additional modifications including orthotics. For example, some shoes and brands adjust to foot swelling throughout the day, while others provide enough space to place orthotics.
 
There are also certain types of shoes that aging feet should avoid. Those include:
  • Any shoes with pointed toes
  • Shoes with heels over 2 inches
  • Shoes that aren’t non-slip
  • Sandals or flip-flops
  • Shoes that don’t have a firm sole (including your slippers)
  • Old, worn shoes (that simply need to be tossed)
  • Shoes with rocker soles (particularly if you have gait problems)
If you are having trouble finding the right shoes to fit your needs, or if you are interested in learning more about custom orthotics and how it could provide additional support for your feet, turn to your podiatrist today for the care your feet deserve.
 
 
 
 
 
 
If you currently own a pair of custom molded orthotics prescribed by us, you can now purchase a second pair for a discounted price of $245! *
 
Having a second pair of custom orthotics is a great option for:
  • A thinner, narrower orthotic that can fit easier into dress shoes, cleats, ice skates, golf shoes, etc.
  • Kids always have their orthotics in their athletic shoes.
  • Convenience of not having to constantly switch your orthotics between shoes. 
 
This is a limited time offer that will end
August 31, 2021 so call us now to get your second pair!
 
Steps to taking advantage of this special promotion:
  1. Call our office at 972-542-2155, press 0.
  2. Mention the email you received.
  3. Our staff will take it from there.

 

As always, we take pride in being your first choice for your foot and ankle needs. If you have any other questions or concerns please give us a call. 

Thanks for your time and have a wonderful day.
 
Sincerely,
 
Advanced Foot and Ankle Center Team
972-542-2155




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