Porokeratosis of the Foot

 

Some people have growths on the bottom of their feet. They can range from moles to calluses or melanoma to warts. However, one particular skin lesion is often mistakened for some of the previously mentioned problems. Porokeratoses are hard, seed-like calluses. They are typically about the size of a sesame seed. Oftentimes, porokeratoses feel like a splinter in the foot. They usually develop on the bottom of the foot at the ball of the foot or the heel. Some people call them “seed corns”.

Many podiatrists feel that porokeratoses are sweat glands that are plugged up with callus tissue. There are approximately 300,000 sweat glands on the bottom of the feet, so there is a large opportunity for at least one of the sweat glands to become plugged off.

These lesions are not malignant or dangerous, but they should be examined by a professional to determine the correct diagnosis.

Some patients have several porokeratoses and others may have only 1 or 2. These lesions can become more painful when the person wears shoes with little or no padding or walk around barefoot. Also if the patient has very little fat pad on the bottom of the foot, they may experience increased pain.

At Advanced Foot & Ankle Center, the doctors will attempt to gently carve out the porokeratoma with a currette or a sharp instrument. Anesthesia is usually not needed.

Sometimes, the doctors will place a mild blistering agent on the lesion to cause exfoliation of the lesion and allow it to “pop out”.

If you have a porokeratoma, please come see Dr. Eric Silvers at Advanced Foot & Ankle Center in either McKinney, TX or Prosper, TX. Our office has years of experience with treating porokeratomas.

Please call 972-542-2155 for an appointment today.

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