McKinney, TX Podiatrist
Advanced Foot and Ankle Center
5531 Virginia Parkway Suite 100
McKinney, TX 75071
(972) 542-2155
Prosper, TX Podiatrist
Advanced Foot and Ankle Center
301 North Preston Road Suite A
Prosper, TX 75078
(972) 542-2155
Advanced Foot and Ankle Center Blog
By contactus@advancedfoottexas.com
April 25, 2017
Category: Uncategorized
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Stress fractures are small cracks or deep bone contusions that usually develop after a sudden increase in your activity or intensity level.  They can also develop from everyday activities because the feet take on all the weight of your body with every step and jump.  Because of this, stress fractures are very common in the long bones of the feet.  Many people will describe a pain to the top of the foot that slowly gets worse and is most painful with activity.  There is usually swelling associated to that area of the foot as well.   An x-ray is the first diagnostic tool we use to help determine if you have a stress fracture.  Sometimes stress fractures are not initially visible on x-rays because the crack in the bone is so small.  Usually after 2-3 weeks, we can start to see signs of the bone healing itself on an x-ray to confirm your diagnosis.  Some people are more prone to developing stress fractures.  Having a structurally abnormal foot type or being overweight will cause unnatural pressure on the bones of your feet.  Some metabolic disorders such as osteoporosis can also predispose you to having stress fractures because your bones can become weaker than they should be.  Treatment usually consists of immobilizing and protecting the foot in an orthopedic shoe or walking boot.  This is to prevent the stress fracture from developing into a complete bone fracture that will take longer to heal.  Most people with a stress fracture will fully recover with immobilization but some people may need the use of a bone stimulator or laser therapy to help stimulate the body to heal your fracture quicker.   You may also need to be supplemented with vitamins to boost your body’s healing potential. 

The doctors at Advanced Foot and Ankle Center have extensive training and experience in the treatment of foot fractures. Call for an appointment today.

972-542-2155

Dr. Eric Silvers, DPM

Dr. Dustin Lloyd, DPM

Dr. Christopher Witt, DPM

Dr. Jan Veloso, DPM

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
April 25, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Summer Feet  

The summertime is a great time to show off your new sandals and allow your feet to breathe. But since the warmer months can be rough on your feet, it's important to give your feet a little extra care to keep them looking great and feeling healthy. Here are a few tips for keeping your feet in tip-top shape during the summer.

Keep feet clean

The best line of defense against fungal infections is proper hygiene and regular inspection of the feet and toes. Wash feet with soap and water daily, and dry them thoroughly to prevent infection. Wear shower shoes in public places, like pools and locker rooms. And to prevent ingrown nails and toenail fungus, keep toenails trimmed straight across.

Avoid walking barefoot

Walking outside in the summertime without shoes increases the risk of injury and infection. You never know what’s sitting out on the beach, and the last thing you want is to unexpectedly step on a sharp rock or piece of debris and cut your foot.

Protect feet from the sun

Wearing sunscreen is extremely important in the summertime - and that means lathering up the exposed skin on your feet and ankles too. If you’re a habitual sandals wearer, make sure to put sunscreen on before putting your feet in your shoes!

Keep your feet fungus free

Coupled with good foot hygiene, you can also prevent toenail fungus by alternating your shoes. If you suspect a fungus infected nail, visit us right away for early treatment.

Treat your feet to a pedicure

Eliminate rough, dead, winter skin and improve the appearance of your toenails with a pedicure. Do it yourself, or pamper yourself with a professional pedicure for attractive summer feet you'll be proud to show off.

The American Podiatric Medical Association recommends getting your pedicure in the morning, when salon foot baths are at their cleanest. Don’t shave your legs prior to your pedicure, even if you’re tempted to! When your legs are freshly shaven, they can have small cuts that allow bacteria to enter. Also, ensure you or the person performing your pedicure does not cut your cuticles, because they are your nail’s barrier to infection.

After the pedicure, don’t leave nail polish on all summer long. Remove it periodically to allow your nail bed to breathe, and then you’re free to swap to another festive summer color!

Prevent painful blisters

Sandals and flip-flops can lead to irritating blisters when they rub against your bare skin. Use padding or bandages to prevent and reduce friction.

Examine your flip flops

Flip flops are great for allowing your feet to breathe all summer long, but thong sandals can result in sore feet and ankles due to their lack of support. Choose styles with arch and heel support to keep feet healthy and pain-free.

Following these easy steps during the summer months can go a long way in keeping your feet looking and feeling their very best. Inspect your feet daily, and if you encounter any unusual foot problems or experience pain, contact our office for a thorough evaluation.

By contactus@advancedfoottexas.com
April 13, 2017
Category: Uncategorized
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At Advanced Foot and Ankle Center, we are proud to offer cold laser technology as another treatment options to our patients using the K Laser.  The K Laser therapy uses specific wavelengths of light to stimulate the body’s natural ability to heal. This is done in a painless manner by drawing water, oxygen and nutrients to the damaged area being treated.  This then reduces inflammation, swelling, muscle spasms/stiffness and pain.  All this leads to a more improved healing environment.    The interaction with damaged tissue from the laser is done at a cellular level which leads to a cascade of beneficial effects which include tissue repair.  The K Laser offers multiple frequencies and wavelengths during treatment to reach the skin, muscle, tendon and bone. 

The typical treatment is usually four to eight minutes in length and is done two to three times per week.  Some people will feel an improvement in their symptoms after the first session and others might not.  Each treatment is cumulative.  Most people obtain the best results after four to six sessions.   During the treatment, there is no pain, sound or vibration.  There may be a gentle warming sensation on the portion of the body that is being treated.  The K laser can be used alongside other treatment plans including physical therapy, soft tissue massage and following surgery to help minimize scaring.  Laser therapy has been used in Europe since the 1970’s and was cleared by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2005. 

 

At Advanced Foot and Ankle Center, Dr. Eric Silvers, Dr. Dustin Lloyd, and  Dr. Christopher Witt use the cold laser to treat Plantar Fasciitis, Achilles Tendonitis, fractures, neuropathy, swelling, acute pain, metatarsalgia, plantar fibromas, hypertrophic scars in addition to many other foot and ankle conditions.  Cold laser therapy with the K-Laser has been made very affordable at Advanced Foot and Ankle Center and package discounts are available. Let K-Laser painlessly treat the aches and pains that are slowing you down. Call today for more information and to schedule an appointment!  

972-542-2155

 
By contactus@advancedfoottexas.com
April 07, 2017
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Diabetic Neuropathy is a condition caused by damage to the nerves that give sensation to your feet and hands.  It is most commonly caused by poor circulation in the small vessels that supply blood to the nerves themselves.  If the nerves do not get the blood supply to keep them healthy, they will begin to deteriorate.   Having elevated glucose levels can also damage the nerves directly or indirectly by causing edema in the nerve sheath (the tissue layer that protects the nerves).  If the nerve sheath becomes swollen, small holes can develop in the nerve sheath due to pressure.  This will then cause the signal that the nerve is sending to your feet to be altered.

Just because you have diabetes, doesn’t mean you will develop diabetic neuropathy.  However, at least 60% of people with diabetes will have one of the symptoms of neuropathy.  The most important thing you can do to prevent these problems is make sure that your glucose levels are tightly controlled.  Symptoms of neuropathy can include tingling, burning, feeling odd/unusual sensations to the extremities and even complete numbness.  If you no longer have sensation to your feet, walking can be difficult and you are at a much higher risk of infection or amputation from wounds because you cannot feel/recognize the severity of the situation    

Treatment for diabetic neuropathy is primarily to reduce the symptoms that you are feeling as the damage to the nerves can be permanent.  Treatment can begin with vitamins, such as NeuRx-TF which contains four unique substances to improve nerve health.  There are also multiple pharmaceutical options that can slow or help the symptoms as well. 

If you have diabetic neuropathy, it is extremely important to monitor your feet and check between your toes daily for any new issues that could develop.  Look for cracks or cuts in the skin, ingrown toenails, blisters, redness, swelling, warmth or drainage.  If anything looks out of the ordinary it is better to have it evaluated than risk the possible complications that may arise if left unchecked.

The doctors at Advanced Foot and Ankle Center have extensive training and experience in the treatment of diabetic complications in the foot.  Call for an appointment today.

972-542-2155

Dr. Eric Silvers, DPM

Dr. Dustin Lloyd, DPM

Dr. Christopher Witt, DPM

By ADVANCED FOOT AND ANKLE CENTER
April 04, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Health  

With age, many people experience changes in their feet. This may include a change in their shape, a loss of the fatty pads that cushion the bottom of the feet, thinner, drier skin, and brittle nails. You may even develop arthritis.

As the feet change, they naturally develop more problems. But aching feet are not a natural part of growing old, or something to be tolerated. You can do many things now to help relieve pain, improve comfort and keep the spring in your step.

Taking good care of your feet has many benefits, including increasing your comfort, limiting the possibility of additional health issues, and keeping you active and mobile. The following tips can help keep feet feeling and looking their best into the golden years:

  • Choose proper-fitting shoes with adequate support, a firm sole and a soft upper for your everyday activities.
  • Walk—it’s the best exercise for your feet.
  • Avoid going barefoot.
  • Never cut corns or calluses on your own.
  • Bathe your feet daily in lukewarm water with a mild soap.
  • Moisturize daily.
  • Trim and file toenails straight across.
  • Inspect your feet daily. If you notice redness, cracks in the skin or strange sores, consult our office.
  • Have your feet examined at least once a year.

There are literally hundreds of different foot ailments. Some are inherited, but for older people most foot conditions stem from the impact of years of wear and tear. The good news is that even among people in their retirement years, many foot problems can be treated successfully.

Never ignore the natural changes that aging brings.  Since feet are referred to as the “mirror of health,” podiatrists are often the first to identify signs of systemic diseases, such as diabetes and arthritis. Regular visits can help prevent foot problems and alleviate pain to keep you active for life.





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